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Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Dementia is a term used to describe a cognitive disorder that leads to an overall decline in memory, to the point where it affects one’s daily activities, such as keeping track of personal items and maintaining a schedule. When brain cells become damaged, abnormalities in cognition and behavior, thought-processing, and general well-being can all occur and be signs of dementia. Worldwide, approximately around 50 million people have dementia, and there are nearly 10 million new cases every year.1

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia and may contribute to 60-70% of cases.1 Alzheimer’s is a progressive illness that causes signs of memory loss and other mental functions. One of the most common early symptoms of Alzheimer's is difficulty remembering newly learned information because this part of the brain is often affected first in patients.

When Alzheimer's progresses, it may lead to more severe symptoms including: disorientation, mood and behavior changes, unfounded suspicions about family, friends, or caregivers, and difficulty speaking, swallowing and walking.

Symptoms

  • Disorientation and confusion

  • Mood and behavior changes

  • Difficulty speaking, swallowing and walking

  • Difficulty remembering new information

  • Unfounded suspicions about family

  • Deepening confusion about events/time/place

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life

  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks

  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships

  • Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps

1World Health Organization

 

Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia | Epilepsy | Multiple Sclerosis (MS)| Brain Health Home

What Are Your Next Steps?

If you have seen the signs of Alzheimer's or dementia, visit your doctor to discuss your concerns.

Contact Advanced Radiology when your physician feels brain imaging is needed to assist with diagnosis. Rest assured that we offer leading-edge equipment in a comfortable, convenient setting.

Contact Advanced Radiology

After speaking with your physician, please contact us for next steps.

Call:  888-972-9700